// Sentimentality//

Today, I jotted down some expansion notes— what I’m calling revisions of ideas— for a play I started two years ago. A few sentences in, I realized that this kind of writing would never, ever have been approved while I was in Oxford. I was usually writing essays, for one thing, but I was also learning from a creative writing tutor who disliked sentimentality so much that he sometimes mistook difficult emotions for it and would yell at me. (No worries. No trauma. He was just a passionate man encased in tweed.) 

Hah. That’s unfair. It’s more like I didn’t care enough to give those difficult emotions their best words— so they became sentimental. And he would yell and I’d know I was a liar. 

Anyway, I sometimes took another crooked shortcut by avoiding honest sentiment altogether. 

I guess I’m trying to say that… I need to remember to give the best words to difficult emotions; rather than skirting life.

amorin:

Jean Cocteau. La Sang d’un Poète, 1930

amorin:

Jean Cocteau. La Sang d’un Poète, 1930

curiositycounts:

Stunning vintage illustrations from a Russian edition of The Hobbit, the best thing since the recently uncovered original J.R.R. Tolkien sketches circa 1936.

And for more Russian-English things!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqdiEUp6s4E Vinny-Peuh (Winnie the Pooh) meets Existential Crises and Guns.

curiositycounts:

Stunning vintage illustrations from a Russian edition of The Hobbit, the best thing since the recently uncovered original J.R.R. Tolkien sketches circa 1936.

And for more Russian-English things!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqdiEUp6s4E Vinny-Peuh (Winnie the Pooh) meets Existential Crises and Guns.

(via curiositycounts)

nationalgeographicdaily:

Cocooned Trees, PakistanPhoto: Russell Watkins
An unexpected side effect of the 2010 flooding in parts of Sindh, Pakistan, was that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters; because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water took so long to recede, many trees became cocooned in spiderwebs. People in the area had never seen this phenomenon before, but they also reported that there were fewer mosquitoes than they would have expected, given the amount of standing water that was left. Not being bitten by mosquitoes was one small blessing for people that had lost everything in the floods.

nationalgeographicdaily:

Cocooned Trees, Pakistan
Photo: Russell Watkins

An unexpected side effect of the 2010 flooding in parts of Sindh, Pakistan, was that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters; because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water took so long to recede, many trees became cocooned in spiderwebs. People in the area had never seen this phenomenon before, but they also reported that there were fewer mosquitoes than they would have expected, given the amount of standing water that was left. Not being bitten by mosquitoes was one small blessing for people that had lost everything in the floods.

(Source: )

ruinawish:

‘Coppola plots out the intensity of the scene in his notebook.’

ruinawish:

‘Coppola plots out the intensity of the scene in his notebook.’

rexpix:

This is Monte Smith, he is 35 years old and lives in Tent City 3 in Seattle. He has been homeless now for two years. He came out from Detroit where he had been a machinist, but now, in Tent City, he has become an activist for the homeless. When you talk with Monte it is obvious that he cares about the people there, that he is putting his heart into making it the best place it can be, that he is proud to be a part of this community. When I was leaving, he came back up to me and said, “Hey, can I send you one of my poems?” I have no doubt it will be beautiful!

rexpix:

This is Monte Smith, he is 35 years old and lives in Tent City 3 in Seattle. He has been homeless now for two years. He came out from Detroit where he had been a machinist, but now, in Tent City, he has become an activist for the homeless. When you talk with Monte it is obvious that he cares about the people there, that he is putting his heart into making it the best place it can be, that he is proud to be a part of this community. When I was leaving, he came back up to me and said, “Hey, can I send you one of my poems?” I have no doubt it will be beautiful!

(Source: homeless-in-seattle)

Leonid Tishkov’s Private Moon series

(Source: thejeanicole, via meghanhers)

Sounds I like right now: freon and Monmouth